06
MAY
2013

Turning Disabilities into Diffabilities (David Ducklow)

 

Here is a blog entry from a Carey student contributor:

It is not surprising that a husband does things differently than his wife. But their unique work is equally required to raise a family. As I think about my parents, mom has long been responsible for managing the money, whereas dad’s job is to earn it. In the kitchen, mom’s role is to make most of the meals and dad’s is to clean up afterwards. Diffabilities is my term for confidently completing an action differently rather than feeling a need to do things the same way as those you admire. As a visually impaired person (V.I.P.) I have needed to learn different ways of completing routine tasks. For instance, the driver of a car in the H.O.V. lane is no more important than the passenger sitting in the next seat over. If I need to know, or not, I am learning to ask more questions so that new insight might be realized. And, whether it is for visual reasons or otherwise, I finish tasks slowly so they may be done well, once. If mom and dad did not have these diffabilities, and passed them on to their kids, delicious meals would not be made, dirty dishes might just remain in the sink and it might take an extra long time to get to work.

David Ducklow is an MASF student at Carey and in his non-academic time is a spiritual director and tutor for children with special needs. He attends CapChurch in North Vancouver where he plays congas on the worship teams and is an advocate for First Nations people. 

Esther Kitchener
Assistant to VP of the Carey Institute

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